Global

Adolescents’ Perceptions of Healthy Relationships: Young people in Bulgaria

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 25th, 2019

From January 2017 to March 2019 the Adolescent Perceptions of Healthy Relationships (APRH) project took place in Bulgaria. This youth lead research investigated young people’s ideas about and experiences with (sexual) relationships. A group of around 40 Youth Peer Researchers (YPRs) were trained in two cities (Sofia and Aytos). They designed research questions and surveys themselves, and conducted both a quantitative and qualitative research amongst around 1300 of their peers. The YPR’s looked into various aspects of relationships in different settings, such as the family, peers/friends and the school. They unpacked concepts like trust, respect, equality, dominance and researched topics such as violence, sexuality and online behavior. Read More

Adolescents’ Perceptions of Healthy Relationships: A Generative Approach to Addressing Child Sexual Violence- Tanzania

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 25th, 2019

In this policy brief we propose an alternative approach to addressing sexual violence drawing on research conducted on adolescent perceptions of healthy relationships in Tanzania. We propose a generative strength-based approach anchored on working with existing community structures that have the potential to positively shape the prevention of sexual violence among young people in Tanzania. The multi method 2-year adolescent guided peer inquiry had the goal of understanding adolescents’ perceptions and experiences of healthy relationships. A total of 8 primary and 4 secondary schools were purposively selected in Kinondoni and Magu districts in Mwanza and Dar-es-salaam respectively. Read More

Final Report Adolescents’ Perceptions of Healthy Relationships Youth Participatory Research Project 2017-2019

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 25th, 2019

Oak Foundation’s Child Abuse Programme Strategy 2012-2016 established that the program would address violence prevention through greater attention to the broader societal, structural factors that provide an enabling environment for the sexual abuse and exploitation of children.The APHR project falls specifically under the second objective, with a focus on encouraging boys and girls to respect each other and their contributions to family and community. Oak hopes to achieve this through two main strategies. One is by emphasizing healthy relationships through, e.g. comprehensive sexuality education and life skills training. The second is by promoting gender equality: challenging social norms that condone or perpetuate inequality, especially in the media. Read More

What Works to Prevent Sexual Violence Against Children: Evidence Review

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 25th, 2019

Sexual violence against children, which includes anyone under the age of 18, is one of the largest silent global pandemics of our time, occurring in countries at all levels of development and affecting children of all ages. Sexual violence consists of a range of sexual acts against a child, including but not limited to child sexual abuse, incest, rape, sexual violence in the context of dating/intimate relationships, sexual exploitation, online sexual abuse, and non-contact sexual abuse. Until recently, very little was known about the true nature of sexual violence against children. However, over the last two decades, a growing number of research efforts to document and understand the dynamics and prevalence of sexual violence against children have started to shed light on its magnitude and consequences. Historically, a great deal of the research has focused on high-income countries (HICs), but significant progress has been made in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). The evidence emerging demonstrates that prevention interventions can make a difference. Read More

Menores Refugiados: Impacto Psicológico y Salud Mental

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 13th, 2019

Con este informe, se analiza el impacto de las situaciones de desplazamientos forzados sobre la salud mental de los niños que deben iniciar una migración obligatoria -solos o acompañados de familiares- al no tener garantizadas su seguridad y la protección de sus derechos fundamentales por su propio Estado, considerando los conflictos bélicos el motivo principal de su partida. Para ello se ha realizado una revisión bibliográfica narrativa, utilizando informes de organismos internacionales, ONGs y artículos de investigadores en el que la infancia y especialmente la infancia sometida a situaciones de vulneración de derechos es su centro de atención. Read More

Situación de derechos humanos de familias, niños, niñas y adolescentes no acompañados refugiados y migrantes en los Estados Unidos de América

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 13th, 2019

El presente informe se enfoca de manera particular en la falta de procedimientos adecuados para la detección e identificación de personas que arriban a los Estados Unidos con necesidades especiales de protección internacional, en el régimen arbitrario y automático de detención migratoria que se aplica a las familias y niños, y en las graves deficiencias en términos de garantías del debido proceso en los procedimientos migratorios. El informe analiza de manera especial los derechos de los NNA en este contexto y los serios riesgos que enfrentan. El informe también examina la securitización, o integración de las cuestiones de migración y control de fronteras en las estructuras de seguridad4 de la frontera sur de los Estados Unidos y las condiciones inadecuadas de la detención migratoria. Read More

Infancias Invisibles: Menores extranjeros no acompañados, víctimas de trata y refugiados en España

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 13th, 2019

En el mundo de hoy, aumenta el número de niños y niñas que migra, y se hacen más complejos los flujos migratorios: en ellos se mezclan migrantes, víctimas de trata con fines de explotación y aquellos que escapan de guerras y persecuciones. Además, son niños y niñas cada vez más jóvenes: del 2000 al 2015, los migrantes menores de 4 años aumentaron en un 41%. En España, hay tres colectivos de niños y niñas especialmente vulnerables y desprotegidos: las niñas víctimas de trata con fines de explotación sexual, los niños que viajan sin nadie que les cuide (conocidos como menores extranjeros no acompañados) y la infancia refugiada. El Estado español no está cumpliendo plena ni satisfactoriamente con sus obligaciones legales respecto a estos grupos; está vulnerando algunos de sus derechos tanto por acción como por omisión. Se antepone su condición de inmigrantes a la de ser menores de edad, y existen contradicciones entre las leyes y prácticas dirigidas a controlar los flujos migratorios y las que tienen como fin proteger a niños y niñas. Read More

Child Rights in the Global Compacts: Recommendations for Protecting, Promoting and Implementing the Human Rights of Children on the Move in the Proposed Global Compacts

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 12th, 2019

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted in 2015 by the UN General Assembly include numerous goals and targets relevant for refugee and migrant children and their families. The SDG framework provides a useful model for monitoring progress towards the achievement of goals concerning refugee and migrant children. Accordingly, this working document uses the same framework (of goals, targets and indicators) to suggest a process for achieving goals and targets concerning refugee and migrant children through the Global Compacts. Though the indicators associated with the SDGs set out to measure progress principally at global level, some of the indicators proposed in this paper would show the level of change at national level Read More

Combating Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Refugee Crises: Lessons from Working with Syrian Refugees in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 12th, 2019

Refugee women and girls are among the populations at highest risk of gender-based violence around the world. Gender-based violence (GBV) is often a prominent feature of armed conflict and a leading factor driving women and girls to flee their countries of origin, bringing with them the trauma associated with being directly subjected or exposed to such violence. The journey of displacement itself is often also rife with the risk of violence, as women and girls are forced to travel unaccompanied and depend on smugglers or other actors who may exploit them. Finally, GBV is often a daily reality in camps and other settings where women and girls find refuge in host countries. Precarious housing arrangements, insecurity, economic vulnerability, and breakdown of family structures all contribute to the proliferation of partner and non-partner violence as well as the resort to negative coping strategies, such as early marriage and transactional sex. Read More

Uprooted: The Growing Crisis for Refugee and Migrant Children

Contributed by a member of the RISE Community • November 12th, 2019

Around the world, nearly 50 million children have migrated across borders or been forcibly displaced – and this is a conservative estimate. More than half of these girls and boys fled violence and insecurity – 28 million in total. These children may be refugees, internally displaced or migrants, but first and foremost, they are children: no matter where they come from, whoever they are, and without exception. Children do not bear any responsibility for the bombs and bullets, the gang violence, persecution, the shriveled crops and low family wages driving them from their homes. They are, however, always the first to be affected by war, conflict, climate change and poverty. Children in these contexts are among the most vulnerable people on earth and this vulnerability is only getting worse. The number of child refugees under the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNHCR) mandate has more than doubled in just 10 years. Read More